Roy Hill mine continues cancer awareness campaign with pink delivery

 

NEWMAN, Western Australia. August 15, 2019. UK-based Trans Global Projects Group (TGP) has delivered a shipment of 62 modules weighing 68,000 tonnes to the Roy Hill iron ore mine near Newman in Western Australia.

Roy Hill, owned by privately-held Hancock Prospecting, encourages its suppliers to paint their equipment pink in support of breast cancer awareness. In 2018 Berge Bulk showed its support by painting the superstructure of its 210,000 DWT iron ore carrier Berge Toubkal pink.

According to Hancock executive chairman Gina Rinehart, with a net worth over US$15 billion, breast cancer is Australia’s most commonly diagnosed cancer and now affects nearly one in eight Australian women.

Rinehart established the practice of painting Roy Hill mining equipment pink in recognition of cancer sufferers and naming them after employees. In May this year it christened two more 296-tonne capacity Hitachi mega trucks with the names of two female cancer survivors.

Speaking at the ceremony (pictured) Rinehart said 42 percent of the mine’s truck drivers are women – a record in the Australian mining industry.

To deliver the latest pink mining equipment, TGP shipped the modules from Dalian to Port Hedland and after “intensive” biosecurity checks they travelled a further 400 kilometres on a single lane road to the Roy Hill site.

“Through expert planning, innovative engineering and careful coordination, our team was able to successfully deliver these modules, despite the particularly challenging conditions,” commented TGP CEO Colin Charnock, “We are very proud to have helped our client support such an important cause with the delivery of these pink modules. Thanks to the diligent and tireless efforts of our team, these modules will now help the mine further demonstrate its commitment to breast cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and survival.”

In addition to project logistics management, TGP services include ship chartering, logistics consultancy and transport engineering.

 

Article courtesy of Freightweek.